Tenkara Fishing Yellowstone National Park

On June 14, 2021 • Comments (0)
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Someone fishing. Picture shows a hand holding an extended tenkara rod over a running creek in Yellowstone National Park.

Tenkara fishing Yellowstone National Park

Tenkara fishing Yellowstone National Park can be a very enjoyable experience if you’re up for it, but planning ahead is key. Here’s what you need to know before you go. Pay particular attention to the native vs. non-native catch and release maps.

#1 Look at and become familiar with the Yellowstone National Park Fishing regulations (pdf) and their Catch a Fish guide.

“Fishing regulations in Yellowstone National Park are structured to strongly support native fish conservation goals. Cutthroat trout are the sole, native trout of the park and were the dominant fish species here prior to Euroamerican settlement. Cutthroat trout, Arctic grayling, mountain whitefish, and other native fishes are important to the ecology of Yellowstone.”

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Fishing simply

On June 8, 2021 • Comments (0)
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ValFish2

June 2021 – As we drove down the canyon following a stream, my friend Val and I couldn’t help but notice how much gear everyone was wearing to fish. The usual: waders, plus vest, lanyards, pouches and all the accessories. It seems fly-fishing has suffered from gear inflation over the years. There is a definite “look” and it certainly appears to require a lot of gear. We found an empty pull out, took an Ito out of the trunk and our small pouch with the basics. We setup a line. 6 minutes later Val had a fish, a beautiful rainbow of good size for that stream. There was little for gear but much joy out of the experience of pulling over, catching a fish, and continuing on to new grounds all while wearing comfortable clothes and sandals. Fishing simply.

ValFish

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No Lines Attached – Become The Kebari – Tenkara Fly Fishing

On March 12, 2021 • Comments (1)
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TJ's fooled trout

TJ’s fooled trout

Essay by: TJ Ferreira
Sitting at a nice warm spot in the sun, taking a breather next to a very small creek many moons ago, I was watching some flies and bugs. You see, this was one of my solo tenkara trips I often like to take in the warmer times of summer, where I can take all the worries of the world, brush them aside even if for just a couple hours, to play tenkara.
As I sat and watched the flies fly around, I started to think to myself, do these bugs have lines connected to them? Do these flies have some weighted line tied directly to their behinds controlling their every natural or unnatural movement?

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Winter Fly-Fishing for Rainbows on the Urban Landscape

On February 13, 2021 • Comments (0)
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Essay by: Brad Trumbo

February 7th, 2021. It had been one year to the day that I stood downstream of the rusty, graffiti-tagged rail bridge on the Touchet River in Dayton, WA. The afternoon offered a gorgeous mix of bluebird and cloud-dappled skies, intermittently pummeling the earth with pea-sized graupel. A soft flip of the wrist landed a hare’s ear nymph with a copper John dropper into a flow seam under the bridge, offering potential to hook into a colorful rainbow trout or steelhead at any moment. 

The year prior, I stood shoulder-to-shoulder with dozens of city and county residents, mostly strangers, pitching sandbags along the levees in an attempt to hold the river in its quickly vanishing channel. Those that could, pitched in, while those that couldn’t, watched hopefully as volunteers engaged in the fight against the rising waters of an epic flood.  

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2020 Retrospective: Tenkara in the Present

On February 5, 2021 • Comments (12)
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by Daniel Galhardo

It’s a bit of a coincidence that I was in the middle of writing a blog post with a similar theme on tenkara reflection when Mike Agneta’s opinion piece “Tenkara’s Future Outside of Japan” popped up over on Tenkara Angler this week, so I’d like to respond to that a bit here.

I think the pandemic did something to many of us, it forced us to reflect on our lives and what’s important. And as a company we’ve considered how we can best continue to serve our community during this time as well.

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Tenkara Pocket Water in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains

On November 14, 2020 • Comments (0)
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photo3Joel St. Marie

Essay by: Joel St. Marie

Local water travels from many places on the Eastern side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Small creeks from the headwaters above meander through the meadows, forest, and the high alpine. Icy water runs as the snow melts and is met with the bubbling hot spring water heated by the geothermal cauldron beneath the Earth’s crust. Spring fed rivers snake the open lands of the caldera and carve the deep gorge as it makes its way beneath the table lands and beyond.

I’ve been fortunate to explore the local outdoors on many levels as an outdoor enthusiast; as a climber, biker, fisherman, hiker, photo1Joel St. Mariephotographer, skier and more. Often revisiting the same area multiple times depending on the activity or adventure. The gorge is one of these places I first explored as a climber nearly 25 years ago with one thing on my mind; to climb the steep pocketed cliffs above. The gorge offers miles of exploring other than climbing as well. On bike you are limited to the the few roads that allow access to the gorge. On foot is another option and has its many advantages to exploring this historic destination.

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Gone Fishing. Sticking to the Familiar Is All We Really Need

On October 28, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Essay by: Dennis Vander Houwen

articlepic3 - Dennis Michael

Whole wheat bread with a glob of peanut butter on one side and a wash of jelly on the other. PBJ’s never let you down. Adding a banana from the bunch, I grab my water bottle, and load my lunch into my small backpack along with my simple tackle and my Tenkara USA Sato rod and I am out the door. Gone fishing. In about 40 minutes I will see an old friend.

In the car I tap on Colorado Public Radio. Ironically, they are talking about the increase in people taking up fly-fishing in Colorado. It is an interview with a familiar voice, John Gierach. The topic is about the effect of more people taking up fly-fishing than ever before. I have my fingers crossed John will mention tenkara or talk briefly about stream etiquette, but my hopes are dashed. It is still a good interview and he has a new book out that I have now added to my reading list. I shut off the radio. Silence gives me room to think.

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Tenkara Fishing Rocky Mountain National Park, Boulder Creek and Beyond

On October 17, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Tenkara Community Submitted Content
Essay by: Cheri Felix

2Cheri FelixTo be honest, I just started fishing a few months ago. I used to know the exact number of days (it’s been about 60) but that started to get weird. In the beginning, I would go to Boulder Creek twice in one day. I’d go to areas where there are less trees to catch my line on. And then I worked my way up to the more dense areas of the creek.

In the early days, I’d only go with my husband and then gradually I started going solo. I watched the knot tying videos and I tried to actually listen to my husband when he showed me, but I tend to get distracted. Then I realized that in the worst case scenario, I could come home to get another fly tied on if I needed to.

Since then, I’ve cast a wider net (see what I did there?) and ventured to a place below Jamestown and also into Clear Creek canyon and along the I-70 (I know. Sounds so romantic). I’ve learned that tenkara fishing Rocky Mountain National Park isn’t like fishing along the Popo Agie in Wyoming. I’ve tested my patience in Wyoming on a tiny part of the Laramie River and will test it again when we go to Montana in a few weeks.

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Tenkara Lake Fishing in the Indian Peaks Wilderness

On October 10, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Indian Peaks Wilderness - Oliver SmithEssay by: Oliver Smith

Living in Lyons, Colorado is a wonderful thing. Walking two blocks to the St. Vrain river to drop a fly in the water is certainly a privilege, and one I don’t take for granted. But the town stretch – like many easily accessible Front Range rivers in Colorado – sees a good deal of pressure, particularly in the summer months. Which means it’s time to head up into the local high country, the Indian Peaks Wilderness.

Tenkara fishing to me is inextricably linked with moving through the mountain wilderness. It is so complimentary to hiking and scrambling around in the alpine, it’s almost silly. Here in the Indian Peaks there is an abundance of low volume, high gradient streams full of trout. And then there’s the high alpine lakes. The tenkara lake fishing is phenomenal, and the whole area is tailor-made for this simple method of fly-fishing.

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Which rod to buy for Sierra tenkara fishing

On June 25, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Tenkara USA had its origins in San Francisco, California. San Francisco is by no means a fly-fishing destination, but that’s where I lived when tenkara came to me. The best opportunities for tenkara were in the Sierra Nevada. Every opportunity I got, I would make the drive to different parts of the Sierras, exploring its diverse waters as I tested rods, made short films on tenkara and just all around had fun learning tenkara.

Sierra tenkara fishing

Margaret fishing tenkara, Sierra Nevada, California

Because it is such a huge area, Sierra tenkara fishing is unique and varied, and as such the ideal Sierra tenkara rod might vary depending on the focus of your fishing. You can find small waters choked up with trees along the foothills and in some nooks of the mountain range, but you can also find wide open waters with large boulders and few trees, big rivers with calm waters, and tiny meandering meadow streams. This post can not cover every situation possible, so we will paint the Sierra in broad strokes this time as we recommend tenkara rods to consider to fish in the Sierras. Down the road will narrow it down to more specific areas.

Our main recommendation if you’re in California or Nevada and regularly fish different parts of the Sierra Nevada would be our longer rods. This would especially include the Ito, our longest adjustable tenkara rod if you know you like fishing the bigger waters, or the Sato or Iwana, both great all-arounder tenkara rods that travel well from small waters to big, and targeting small to large fish of the Sierras.
Tenkara Sierra Nevada Outing
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Which tenkara rod to buy for Colorado: Boulder / Front Range?

On June 15, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Boulder in Colorado is our home, and we fish all the waters around here frequently. Thus this is a good place to start our, “Which tenkara rod to buy for my region?” series. In this case, “Which tenkara rod to buy for Colorado” focusing on the Boulder and Front Range areas.

Boulder sits right on the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. To the West we have the mountains, to the East we have plains. Going North we can reach the larger rivers of Wyoming, and going into the mountains we can choose to fish small streams or large rivers. The diversity of waters around Boulder is one of the reasons we chose to move Tenkara USA here many years ago.
Tenkara rod, Sawtooth mountain in Indian Peaks of Colorado
The variety of waters can also mean a variety of tenkara rods can be used successfully around here. But hopefully this will help you narrow down the ideal choice of tenkara rod to use here.
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All About Tenkara Nets – video and podcast episode now available

On April 14, 2020 • Comments (0)
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Over the weekend I created my longest video/podcast episode for the Tenkara Cast yet. This time I cover everything about tenkara nets (also known as tenkara “tamo”): where do they come from, how they are made, how to use a tenkara net, and how to make your own. I go into a lot of detail into every aspect of tenkara nets in this episode. The episode clocks in at over one hour and twenty minutes, so I also added timestamps of different sections if you’re interested in one area over another.

Watch now and get more information here or by clicking the image below

Tenkara Nets Podcast

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New Episodes of our podcast are now available: How to Find and Explore New Fishing Waters

On March 24, 2020 • Comments (2)
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We are reviving the Tenkara Cast!
After a fairly long hiatus from recording the podcast, the recent circumstances we are all facing made me realize that our need to connect is bigger than ever. We are being asked to socially distance ourselves, but I think we should simply “Distance together” as I may have heard somewhere the other day.
Fly-fishing content will be a refuge that we can look to for to take a break from the anxiety producing news cycle of today. And, of course, there is getting outside and fishing too, although there may be some restrictions on where can, can’t, should or shouldn’t go at the moment.
There are two episodes that just came online. One a few days ago where I talk about socially distancing, and just a little bit of what kept me from recording over the last year. And, today I recorded this episode on finding and exploring new waters. You can click the images below to listen to each of the episodes right within our site, or you can use your favorite podcasting app to subscribe, just look up Tenkara Cast.
I hope you’ll enjoy these, and I’d love to hear from you about what strategies you use to find new waters and if this time of socially distancing is making you explore waters closer to home, whether you have fished a new place or for new species because of covid-19, or simply how you are using fly-fishing (indoors or outdoors) to cope.

How to Find and Explore New Fishing Waters:

How to Find and Explore New Fishing Waters

Social Distancing, and the Relaunch of the Tenkara Cast:

TenkaraCast_SocialDistancing

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A Message from Tenkara USA: Covid19, Warehouse Closure Sale, and more

On March 23, 2020 • Comments (7)
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Due to a potential warehouse closure, we are offering a 30% discount on all our rods and my book to try to move inventory out of our warehouse while we can so that we can get through this with all our staff. And a free hat will be included with every purchase containing a rod or more. We would love to have your support!

A Message from Tenkara USA and its founder

We, at Tenkara USA, have been closely monitoring the situation created by Covid-19. Like all Americans we share the same concerns and anxieties, and our hearts go out do anyone enduring the initial impacts of this crisis. Continue reading

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Tenkara Magazines – Volumes 1, 2, and 3 now available for free here
PLUS: A FREE Tenkara Coloring Book

On March 19, 2020 • Comments (4)
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As you seek some social distancing by staying at home, we are working on bringing some content for your enjoyment.
Starting now, we are putting all 3 volumes of the Tenkara Magazine here for free for you to download. We hope you enjoy the articles written for the magazine by the tenkara community. This was a project that lasted 3 seasons and we did a few years ago, but all the articles in them are truly timeless.
And, as a bonus, our designer Jeremy just finished putting together the first Tenkara Coloring Book! We hope this may be a fun activity for you and your family, or something that will entertain the kids.

 Tenkara Coloring Book

Tenkara Coloring book cover

 Tenkara Magazine 2016

Tenkara Magazine 2016 cover mockup


Tenkara Magazine 2015

Tenkara Magazine cover mockup

Tenkara Magazine 2014 

Tenkara Magazine Cover

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